Jounal entry 4 Kanae Yamaguchi

*Washington, D.C.

In this journal, I’d like to write about my experience and consideration about restaurants in Washington, D.C.. In Washington, D.C. I was able to go to many restaurants as almost all meals were on our own. On the first day of free time (8/15), my friends and I were going to go to a restaurant near the Chinatown, which joined the “restaurant week”. But we mistakenly had reserved a wrong shop and couldn’t have lunch at that shop… So that day we had lunch in another shop, which sells hamburgers. Also on the second free time(8/16), my friends and I went to a fancy Japanese restaurant “RAKUYA”. In this shop we ate delicious Japanese food, sushi. It was truly delicious and we were very satisfied. But after we finished eating we also found it was not a good timing to eat Japanese food because it was so delicious that we missed Japan and Japanese food so much… In addition to these two restaurants I visited many restaurants in Washington, D.C.

Through the experiences in restaurants I found that American restaurant clerks look more friendly than Japanese restaurant clerks, and Japanese cafe clerks look more friendly than American cafe clerks. I think these differences partly come from the custom of tip. There is almost no difference of service quality between Japanese restaurant and Japanese cafe, and this is because the custom of tip doesn’t exist in Japan. On the other hand, it exist in America. But I found that the custom of tipping in America is different between restaurants and cafes. Tip for restaurants is paid most of the time and the rate is fixed customarily. But tip for cafes is often the changes of customers’ payment and the rate is not fixed. Therefore supposing that the service quality is determined by the amount or certainty of tip, I can say that American restaurant staff can be more keen to work and friendly to customers. The difference of service quality between restaurants and cafes in America is so obvious that I found American restaurant clerks look more friendly than Japanese restaurant clerks, and Japanese cafe clerks look more friendly than American cafe clerks.

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